Connect with us

Vehicles

Tesla Driver’s Complaint Being Looked Into by US Auto Safety Regulators

Published

on

US auto safety regulators are looking into a complaint from a Tesla driver that the company’s Full Self-Driving software caused a crash.

Source: business-standard.com

Vehicles

This Week’s Earnings Repertoire

Published

on

Last week ended with the Omicron Covid variant casting a shadow over the joy revolving around the upcoming holidays. This week, Costco (NASDAQ: COST), Stitch Fix (NASDAQ: SFIX), Lululemon Athletica (NASDAQ: LULU), and GameStop Corporation (NYSE: GME) will show how they are weathering global challenges that even got the big ones tripped up.

1. Stitch Fix

The online apparel specialist’s shares have been having a hard time this year, which means the bar is set low for its Tuesday report. Back in September, management expected sales growth to slow to as low as 15% in the new fiscal year, compared to last year’s 23%. Although that slowdown might be temporary, Wall Street is worried about the impact of slowing growth, rising competition, and pressured margins due to supply chain disruptions and inflationary costs.

Adding direct shopping offerings is expected to help the subscription-based apparel delivery service business unlock a much bigger addressable market. But as it faces off well-established rivals, Stitch Fix has fewer competitive advantages.

Everyone’s eyes will be on the engagement metrics such as average spending will help show whether Stitch Fix is succeeding in reaccelerating sales growth. But investors are doubting the business’ capability to recapture that 20% sales …

Full story available on Benzinga.com

Original Source: benzinga.com

Continue Reading

Vehicles

The Movement to Hold AI Accountable Gains More Steam

Published

on

By

Enlarge (credit: MirageC | Getty Images)

Algorithms play a growing role in our lives, even as their flaws are becoming more apparent: a Michigan man wrongly accused of fraud had to file for bankruptcy; automated screening tools disproportionately harm people of color who want to buy a home or rent an apartment; Black Facebook users were subjected to more abuse than white users. Other automated systems have improperly rated teachers, graded students, and flagged people with dark skin more often for cheating on tests.

Now, efforts are underway to better understand how AI works and hold users accountable. New York’s City Council last month adopted a law requiring audits of algorithms used by employers in hiring or promotion. The law, the first of its kind in the nation, requires employers to bring in outsiders to assess whether an algorithm exhibits bias based on sex, race, or ethnicity. Employers also must tell job applicants who live in New York when artificial intelligence plays a role in deciding who gets hired or promoted.

In Washington, DC, members of Congress are drafting a bill that would require businesses to evaluate automated decision-making systems used in areas such as health care, housing, employment, or education, and report the findings to the Federal Trade Commission; three of the FTC’s five members support stronger regulation of algorithms. An AI Bill of Rights proposed last month by the White House calls for disclosing when AI makes decisions that impact a person’s civil rights, and it says AI systems should be “carefully audited” for accuracy and bias, among other things.

Read 27 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Original Source: arstechnica.com

Continue Reading

Vehicles

Emails Show What Happened Before Missouri Gov. Falsely Called Journalist a “hacker”

Published

on

Enlarge / Missouri Gov. Mike Parson speaks during a press conference on May 29, 2019 in Jefferson City, Missouri. (credit: Getty Images | Jacob Moscovitch )

Missouri state government officials planned to publicly thank a journalist who discovered a security flaw until a drastic change in strategy resulted in the governor labeling the journalist a “hacker,” while threatening both a lawsuit and prosecution.

As we wrote on October 14, St. Louis Post-Dispatch reporter Josh Renaud identified a security flaw that exposed the Social Security numbers of teachers and other school employees in unencrypted form in the HTML source code of a publicly accessible website. Renaud and the Post-Dispatch handled the problem the way responsible security researchers do—by notifying the state of the security flaw and keeping it secret until after it was fixed.

Despite that, Missouri Gov. Mike Parson called Renaud a “hacker” and said the newspaper’s reporting was nothing more than a “political vendetta” and “an attempt to embarrass the state and sell headlines for their news outlet.” The Republican governor said further that his “administration has notified the Cole County prosecutor of this matter,” that the Missouri State Highway Patrol’s Digital Forensic Unit would investigate “all of those involved,” and that state law “allows us to bring a civil suit to recover damages against all those involved.”

Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Article: arstechnica.com

Continue Reading

Trending

UXQS.com